Ask Monica: Manage your stress like a boss

Monica Bey (Photo provided)

In my early 20s, I accomplished what almost every young, post-college adult dreams of: I landed a corporate job that paid well and gave me incredible opportunities for advancement.

But there’s a cost.

After spending so much time grinding my way to the top, I found myself stressed out, not able to walk or use my hands, and in and out of multiple hospitals with an (at the time) undiagnosable illness. Doctors didn’t know what was wrong with me. All of my lab tests came back “normal,� and I looked perfectly fine on paper despite experiencing partial paralysis, brain fog and many other scary symptoms. They incorrectly diagnosed me with countless diseases and conditions for two years — all to find out that it was stress.

What? Yes, stress built up over time was causing my body to break down. I decided to take my power back and not give in to this illness. I healed myself within just six months. This started me off on a journey to fully commit to healing others and helping them take their power back as well.

There are a number of people fighting the same battle every single day. According to statistical data, the millennial generation is leading the pack when it comes to dealing with these two mental health ailments, likely due to the same haunting feelings of achieving the success that I had. But everyone else isn’t too far behind.

What may be missing is the voice encouraging people to unleash their personal power to become a boss over themselves, understanding that stress and depression don’t have to be a part of their story. We all have the power within ourselves to overcome these issues.

Here are two tips:

Recognize the triggers. Paying attention to the things in your life that cause feelings of self-doubt and high anxiety will help you understand the root cause. Then, it’s time to take action by either choosing a calming strategy or beginning to change whatever circumstances are ailing you. 

Create a calming strategy. The following can have a lot of benefits and help reduce and prevent high levels of stress:

    • Seeking an energy healer
    • Listening to music
    • Reading a book
    • Taking walks
    • Breathing exercises
    • Acupuncture
    • Exercise

But be careful to choose the right calming strategy. Some people tend to use alcohol to calm themselves down, and this is an example of something that, although fun, is generally destructive to the body if you do it too often. Whatever you decide to do as your calming technique, make sure it is something that is beneficial, not destructive to the mind, body or spirit. 

It’s impossible to live a life that is stress-free with no emotional discomfort, especially during pivotal times. Whatever the stage of life, remembering that you always have the power within you to turn any situation around is vital. Now, that’s the true definition of being a boss.

 

 

Rolling Out

Rolling Out

I aim a razor sharp, panoramic lens on popular culture and dissect it for our network of curious, aspirational, savvy and eccentric enthusiasts. I have the strength of an eagle and soul of a phoenix. #IAmRollingOut.

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